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Reports that ICE targets teenagers with alleged gang affiliations and articulates gang criteria

  1. Date Announced

    July 21, 2017

    Press and advocacy groups report that ICE targets teenagers with alleged gang affiliations in immigration raids. ICE reportedly uses several "indicators" of gang activity in identifying targets, including having gang tattoos, frequenting areas "notorious for gangs," and wearing gang apparel.

    The raids are set to begin according to an internal memo seen by Reuters. The teenagers targeted will be 16- and 17-years-old.

    The raids represent a sharp departure from practices during the presidency of Barack Obama. Under Obama, minors could be targeted for deportation if they had been convicted of crimes, but were not arrested simply for suspected gang activity or membership. [ID #266]

    View Policy Document
  2. Effective Date of Change

    July 21, 2017
Status: Reported
Type of Action: Change in Practice
Subject Matter: Interior
Agencies Affected: ICE

Commentary

Think Progress

Immigration authorities have targeted and deported criminally convicted gang members for decades. But since this spring, they are increasingly using gang allegations made by local law enforcement, school resource officers, border agents, and others to round up, detain, and place undocumented youth and adults in deportation proceedings, according to legal experts, immigration attorneys, and youth advocates across the country who say these gang-related deportations proceed even when evidence is weak, unsubstantiated, or even non-existent.

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False Claims of Gang-Ties Ruin Lives and are on the Rise

Unsubstantiated gang allegations can greatly impact the legal case of immigrants in deportation proceedings. Allegations of gang affiliation can increase the chance that a person will be detained. If detained, a person with gang allegations in their record will likely be denied bond altogether. When an immigrants moves on to their final hearing, gang allegations are then a big hurdle to overcome to win their cases.

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